Articles | Volume 9, issue 2
Geosci. Instrum. Method. Data Syst., 9, 483–490, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/gi-9-483-2020
Geosci. Instrum. Method. Data Syst., 9, 483–490, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/gi-9-483-2020

Research article 18 Dec 2020

Research article | 18 Dec 2020

Using near-surface atmospheric measurements as a proxy for quantifying field-scale soil gas flux

Andrew Barkwith et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Anna Mirena Feist-Polner on behalf of the Authors (02 Sep 2020)  Author's response
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (02 Sep 2020) by Tim van Emmerik
AR by Svenja Lange on behalf of the Authors (09 Oct 2020)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (12 Oct 2020) by Tim van Emmerik
RR by Anonymous Reviewer #1 (21 Oct 2020)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (27 Oct 2020) by Tim van Emmerik
AR by Andrew K. A. P. Barkwith on behalf of the Authors (03 Nov 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Soil gas flux describes the movement of various gases either to or from the ground. Identifying changes in soil gas flux can lead to a better understanding and detection of leakage from carbon capture and storage (CCS) schemes, diffuse degassing in volcanic and geothermal areas, and greenhouse gas emissions. Traditional chamber-based techniques may require weeks of fieldwork to assess a site. We present a new method to speed up the assessment of diffuse leakage.