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Geoscientific Instrumentation, Methods and Data Systems An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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GI | Articles | Volume 9, issue 1
Geosci. Instrum. Method. Data Syst., 9, 223–238, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/gi-9-223-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Geosci. Instrum. Method. Data Syst., 9, 223–238, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/gi-9-223-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 28 May 2020

Research article | 28 May 2020

Mesospheric winds measured by medium-frequency radar with full correlation analysis: error properties and impacts on studies of wind variance

Maude Gibbins and Andrew J. Kavanagh

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Andrew J. Kavanagh on behalf of the Authors (04 Mar 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (06 Mar 2020) by Olivier Witasse
RR by Anonymous Reviewer #2 (17 Mar 2020)
RR by Anonymous Reviewer #1 (28 Mar 2020)
ED: Publish as is (29 Mar 2020) by Olivier Witasse
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
Medium-frequency radars measure winds (between 55 and 100 km altitude). As part of their final year undergraduate project, the lead author used two radars in Antarctica to look at how the wind speed varied with the aim of identifying when the wind was too fast to be a real measurement. Instead, we discovered that the variance depends strongly on factors in the analysis technique rather than on natural features such as gravity waves, and that the Sun and geomagnetic activity play a role.
Medium-frequency radars measure winds (between 55 and 100 km altitude). As part of their final...
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