Articles | Volume 10, issue 2
Geosci. Instrum. Method. Data Syst., 10, 297–312, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/gi-10-297-2021
Geosci. Instrum. Method. Data Syst., 10, 297–312, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/gi-10-297-2021

Research article 24 Nov 2021

Research article | 24 Nov 2021

Evaluating methods for reconstructing large gaps in historic snow depth time series

Johannes Aschauer and Christoph Marty

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • CC1: 'Comment on gi-2021-16', Michael Matiu, 13 Jul 2021
  • RC1: 'Comment on gi-2021-16', Anonymous Referee #1, 22 Jul 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on gi-2021-16', J. Ignacio López-Moreno, 22 Jul 2021
  • RC3: 'Comment on gi-2021-16', Anonymous Referee #3, 03 Sep 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Johannes Aschauer on behalf of the Authors (04 Oct 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (06 Oct 2021) by Alessandro Fedeli
RR by Anonymous Reviewer #1 (15 Oct 2021)
ED: Publish as is (20 Oct 2021) by Alessandro Fedeli
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Short summary
Methods for reconstruction of winter long data gaps in snow depth time series are compared. The methods use snow depth data from neighboring stations or calculate snow depth from temperature and precipitation data. All methods except one are able to reproduce the average snow depth and maximum snow depth in a winter reasonably well. For reconstructing the number of snow days with snow depth ≥ 1 cm, results suggest using a snow model instead of relying on data from neighboring stations.